Working in a motorhome

We have arrived in Waldport, on the Oregon Coast. We decided for a KOA campground. While KOAs usually charge a slightly higher per night fee, they also usually offer a more reliable WiFi connection, which is necessary for working in a motorhome. We were not disappointed. During the day, speeds can be as high as 12-14 Mbps and in the evening drops to the levels shown in the screenshot – 7.92 Mbps.

I can only assume the drop in speed is due to people streaming videos and such.

Internet Speed

Having good WiFi connectivity is important as I work two days a week in my marketing capacity for a software company. I need access to email, work on our corporate website, communicate with co-workers using SKYPE and make phone calls to prospects or to chase up leads. All of this requires decent WiFi speed.

While the 12-14 Mbps during the day is more than adequate for my work, we cannot blindly rely on the RV Park having that type of connectivity. We therefore also travel with no less than three hotspots, each for a different cellular network, so we have all options covered. We have an AT&T phone that includes a 10 MB data plan and two non-phone hotspot devices with a “pay as you go” data plan option. That way we can control our costs and only purchase data if and when we need it.

We have a Jetpack for the Verizon network and a Karma WiFi for the Sprint network. Usually, between those three options, I can always get a decent connection. Today, I measured the AT&T hotspot at a massive 22Mbps and the Karma WiFi at a highly respectable 18Mbps. In other words, I would have been in a good place if the RV Park had a lousy or unreliable connection. I can stream video with those speeds and even do demonstrations of our software via the Internet, the performance is that good.

To connect to the RV Park’s WiFi, we have a WiFi Ranger, which is mounted on the roof of the motorhome. This acts like a booster antenna, allowing us to pick up WiFi access points located up to 2500 feet away. Think of free offerings such as a nearby Starbucks, a Home Depot or even hotels. Our laptops could never connect to access points so far away so the WiFi Ranger really extends the options available. In the case of RV Park WiFi, it doesn’t matter how far away we are parked, the Ranger will deliver a signal to us.

The WiFi Ranger does this by creating a private network inside the motorhome, so we are the only ones that can use this device. Very nice.

Network in the motorhome
Central to this network is the WiFi Ranger which is mounted on the roof of our motorhome. It picks up signals from remote locations or from any of our three hotspots and delivers that via a network cable to a router inside the coach. This provides with a private network to which we connect all our devices. Simple, but very powerful.

The end result is a perfect working environment, as good as being at home.

Linda and I have an arrangement, when I work, she does her art. That way both of us can concentrate, undisturbed, on our work. A perfect blend of having fun in the motorhome and fulfilling work obligations without compromise.


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One Comment

  1. Thank you Albert for really explaining this. I was so curious how all that worked! It is truly amazing how todays technology allows you to such physical freedom.

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